Spain holidays: The FIVE things you need to know about holidays to Spain

Coronavirus cases have spiked in some areas of Spain, prompting the British Government to drop the country from the list of countries exempt from quarantine measures on arrival back into the UK. Any travellers arriving back onto UK soil will now have to self-isolate for 14 days.

Spanish authorities have reintroduced lockdown measures in some areas due to spiking cases, triggering the move back onto the Government’s ‘red list’ of countries.

Spain was removed from the Government’s list of countries exempt from quarantine on July 26.

Health minister Helen Whately told the BBC reinstating quarantine rules was the “right thing to do” in order to keep the UK’s virus rate “right down” and avoid a second spike.

Ms Whately urged anyone considering booking a holiday to “be mindful that we are still in the situation of a global pandemic”.

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Here are the five things you need to know about holidays to Spain

1. Some travel providers are cancelling planned holidays

Holiday giant TUI has scrapped holidays to mainland Spain in the wake of the country being added to the Government’s ‘red list’.

Tui said it would contact the customers who were affected and offer the right to cancel or amend their holidays.

A statement said: “All customers currently on holiday can continue to enjoy their holiday and will return on their intended flight home.”

Tui added health and safety was its highest priority, but urged the Government to “work closely” with the travel industry.

It said: “This level of uncertainty and confusion is damaging for business and disappointing for those looking forward to a well-deserved break.”

Other airlines like British Airways and Wizz Air have said they will continue to offer flights, but may re-evaluate the situation as time goes on.

Jet2 has also cancelled all flights from the UK to mainland Spain up to August 16.

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2. Are the Spanish Islands included?

Those travelling back from

  • mainland Spain
  • the Canary Islands – Tenerife, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, La Palma, La Gomera, El Hierro and La Graciosa
  • the Balearic Islands – Majorca, Menorca, Ibiza, and Formentera

Must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival back to the UK.

However, the FCO has not advised against travelling to the Balearic and Canary Islands like it has advised against travel to mainland Spain.

3. Rules on arrival

Some areas of Spain have rules in place for wearing masks, curfews for bars and limited numbers on beaches.

The North East of Spain – including Barcelona – has ordered all nightclubs to close for 15 days and bars have a midnight curfew in place.

It is work checking the regulations for the area you are travelling to, and you can do so on the Government’s website here. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/travel-advice-novel-coronavirus

4. Airport restrictions

On arrival, holidaymakers entering Spain from the UK will not be required to self-isolate.

However, they will be subject to the following three requirements:

  • Provide the Spanish Ministry of Health with mandatory contact information and any history of exposure to COVID-19 48 hours prior to travel
  • Temperature check
  • Undergo a visual health assessment

5. Returning to the UK

On your arrival back to the UK from Spain you will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.

This means returning to your home address and not leaving for any reason, or allowing anyone outside your household to visit.

Those self-isolating should arrange food to be dropped off through friends or family, or use supermarket delivery services to avoid leaving the house.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman said decisions on border measures and travel advice “can be changed rapidly if necessary to help stop the spread of the disease”.

He went on: “Unfortunately no travel is risk-free during this pandemic and disruption is possible and so anyone travelling abroad should be aware that our travel advice and exemption list is under constant review as we monitor the international situation.”

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